Forgetting to ask, and assuming we ought only pray “Thy will be done”

We often forget that the Bible tells us to ask for things. James 4:2: “You do not have because you do not ask.” Jesus said ask, seek, knock (Matt 7:7). The widow’s request was heard because of her annoying persistance (Luke 18). Let your requests be made known to God (Phil 4).

Surely, we know that God will do what is best and that we should desire his will to be done. But we are not limited to just saying “God you do what is best.” Even Jesus asked that the cup be taken from him, only after that saying “Nevertheless, thy will be done.”

We should saturate ourselves in the Word, and then pray with bold requests. 

We should ask for and expect healing in miraculous ways (I have been doing that a lot the last few hours for a friend). We should ask God, and then, as Philippians 4 says, trust that he will answer according to his perfect good pleasure. 

Don’t be afraid to ask. Spurgeon said:

I cannot imagine any one of you tantalizing your child by exciting in him a desire you do not intend to gratify. It were a very ungenerous thing to offer alms to the poor, and then when they hold out their hand for it, to mock their poverty with a denial [….] Where God leads you to pray, he means you to receive. (Quoted in Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life, 79).

God is a Father, and he, like a good Father, loves to give good gifts in answer to his children’s requests.

So ask him. 

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About Danny Slavich

I am a Christian husband, father, pastor, and poet. I lead Pembroke Road Baptist Church a multi-cultural, multi-generational church in urban South Florida.
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One Response to Forgetting to ask, and assuming we ought only pray “Thy will be done”

  1. sarah says:

    Awesome post, Danny. You’ve really made me think a lot about this and it’s changed the way that I pray. Thank you for posing the tough questions and seeking truthful answers.
    Love you.

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