Natural Bragging

In my Intro to Missiology J-Term my professor said that an old mentor pastor once gave him some advice for young ministers: “When in doubt, brag on Jesus”.

I got to thinking about the idea of what it means to “brag on” anyone or anything. Sometimes, when I’m telling people about Laura, I’ll say, “I’m going to brag on my wife…” and then say something about what Laura has done or accomplished. It just flows naturally out because I love my wife and I love to tell people about her and about great things related to her.

I think it should be the same way with “bragging on Jesus”.

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About Danny Slavich

I am a Christian husband, father, pastor, and poet. I lead Pembroke Road Baptist Church a multi-cultural, multi-generational church in urban South Florida.
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10 Responses to Natural Bragging

  1. Ben says:

    I don’t think people “brag on” things in California.

  2. Lee says:

    Then what do we do, Ben?

  3. Ben says:

    Perhaps there is no equivalent concept in our dialect. If language enables ideas, does this mean then that Californians do not have the capacity to “brag on”?

  4. Lee says:

    Yeah, Californians are the best, we have no capacity to brag on… Oh.

    Incidentally, for some interesting insight into that question (does language enable ideas?), read A Man Without Words.

  5. Danny Slavich says:

    Y’all are plumb dern regional bigots.

  6. Danny Slavich says:

    Actually, just Bin.

  7. dad says:

    In “real English” (as spoken in California, where the language originated – or was at least perfected) we brag “about” rather than “on” somebody or something.

    Don’t (you*) remember how civilized people speak?

    And the state with the presidential primary this Saturday is pronounced “Ne-VA (‘a’ as in ‘at’) – Duh”…NOT “Ne- VAH- Duh”.

    ( * Y’all?)

    “English” major, huh?

    PS…and when one says “brag on” somebody or something, it MUST be pronounced “brag OWN” to make it fit the vernacular.

    What other de-programming must I do?

  8. Danny Slavich says:

    Dad,

    You can de-program me this weekend when YAWL fly in.

    Bin = “Ben” in accented form.

  9. Lee says:

    Ah – of course. I thought it was the past tense of “to be”… I should have clued in on the capital “B”.

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